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, the student who inspired this. she began getting headaches and a mr reveali an inoperable brain tumor. but if you ask her -- >> sick is you have the flu, ill is you are going to die. she says she is sick, not ill. >> 8 qualify her to travel to paris and through the make a wish foundation. to g through her treatments, she thinks often of that trip. and she started a remarkable movement of giving. >> 180, i think. >> every letter delivered -- the departmentill donate $1 to make a wish. the challenge -- right 10,000 letters. >> when i heard about the brain tumor i felt so strange inside. i did not really like it. now i am here i feel like i'm doing organizes are convinced thanks to the power of community and her facebook page that this little girl pasquale will be met, insuring another child -- this little girl's goal will be met. >> we are told the 10,000 letters will be delivered december 23. gabriele is expected to finish her round of cancer treatment before her 10th birthday, in mid january. linda in the newsroom, jay korff. >> thank you for that. a family spent part night celebratin
saying thank you all. i have a lot to be grateful for her. but mr. president, pna senator and since this is my farewell speech, i do have a few more things i'd like to say. i am leaving the senate at a moment in our history when america faces daunting challenges, both domestic and foreign and went too often our problems seem greater than our government's ability to solve them. but i can tell you that i remained deeply optimistic about america's future and constantly inspired by the special destiny but i'm convinced is ours as american. my hot medicine is based not in theory or hope, but in american history and in personal experience. i think particularly about my time in public life and especially the changes i've witnessed since i took the oath of office as a senator on january 3rd company and 89. the fact is over the past quarter century, america and the world have become freer and more prosperous. the iron curtain was peacefully torn down of the soviet empire defeated. the eternal values of freedom and opportunity in which america was founded and for which we still stand have mad
of her time. the gentleman from florida is recognized. mr. bilirakis: mr. speaker, i have no further speakers. does the gentlelady have further speakers? ms. hochul: i'd like to yield such time to the ranking member of the homeland subcommittee on transportation security, homeland security, the gentlewoman from texas, ms. jackson lee. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlelady from texas is recognized. ms. jackson lee: i want to thank the gentlelady from new york and i want to say first of all this will not be the last that we hear of your voice. and what a stupendous voice you have. thank you so very much for making this time on the floor a time that pays tribute to veterans, but also recognizes the outstanding service that you've given to this nation, to the committee on homeland security and your other committees, but more importantly, the passion that you've shown as a true american. i hope that we heed the voice that you just lifted up, that we owe to veterans not only this great legislation, but also the ability to come together and work on their behalf and all americans. again, t
in her eyes and she said, mrs., summers, we all wish for that for our children. >> we are so sorry for you and we hope you one day do get to bring preston home to your home. >> thank you. >> dr. jane aronson is a pediatrician and international adoption specialist. she is the founder and ceo of worldwide orphans foundation. and she joins me now. tough interview, certainly for these families to see what they're going through. i see you're even emotional having watched that just now. what do you make of what's going on here? what do you make of this bill, and what do you think is the motivation behind it? >> i think it's very simple. this is a retaliation, a political maneuver. the russian and american relationships, the relationship between america and russia is in a disaster relationship at this point, but what's really important is first to focus on what we can do to advocate for the families because there are hundreds of families involved, and this is something that has been part of russian adoptions for 25 years. as long as russian adoption has been around, it's been a problem th
: the gentlelady yields back the balance of her time. the gentleman from new jersey. mr. lobiondo: continue to reserve. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman reserves. the gentleman from washington. mr. larsen: thank you, mr. speaker. i'd like to yield two minutes to the gentlelady from oregon, ms. bonamici. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlelady is recognized. ms. bonamici: i rise in support of h.r. 2838 to protect our marine economy, protect our maritime borders and protect the brave coast guard personnel, including the personnel of the sector columbia river which is headquartered in oregon's first congressional district. i thank the coast guard subcommittee for their work on this and the full and ranking member of the full transportation and infrastructure committee. in supporting the basic mission of the coast guard, this bill includes language to re-authorize another important mission carried out, noaa's marine debris program. in june of this year, coastal residents in my home state of oregon found a 66-foot dock resting on a beach near the town of new port, oregon. the dock was just
. just let's get started. thank you, mr. chairman. >> i think the gentlelady. i also think her for 15 years. we talked about having union station is a true intermodal center. we used to have our people come to the greyhound station to three plot, drag their luggage to union station. we used to go around town to take a bus with satellite location. ms. norton was with me and in 15 minutes we got it done, dedicated, came up for that jury in a very heated election. they thank you for your leadership. not the secretary come but the deputy secretary was instrumental in making nation's capital headteacher intermodal center. i think both of you. ms. edwards. >> thank you, mr. chairman. i want to thank all of our witnesses today and particularly thank secretary lahood. i understand it's your birthday. i don't think i would've chosen to spend my birthday with you, but i'm glad you've chosen to spend your birthday with us. particularly to the chairman for holding this hearing and discussion today about high-speed rail. we had a chance to begin a half ago to go up to new york and less amtrak, but
and look at other ambassador ships >> chris: it could doesn't go to her could go to mr. blackwell. >> brian: finallyy a royall baby bump. kate middleton is meg frant. this morning a scare and why she's in the hospital. >> steve: little boys as well . one making a mission to get a easy bake oven to make changes. call brian on the cell phone and all of you folks in indiana know the number. share the number. ♪ (phone ringing) um... uh... um... hm... umm... uh... oh ! the windows phone 8x by htc on verizon. it features easy to navigate live tiles that are simple to customize. just pin what matters most right to your homescreen. exclusively with data sense-- a feature that makes the most of you plan. only on verizon. i've been fortunate to win on golf's biggest stages. but when joint pain and stiffness from psoriatic arthritis hit, even the smallest things became difficult. i finally understood what serious joint pain is like. i talked to my rheumatologist and he prescribed enbrel. enbrel can help relieve pain, stiffness, and stop joint damage. because enbrel, etanercept, suppresses your immun
. i thank her so much for working so well and hard on this. ms. stabenow: mr. president? the presiding officer: the senator from michigan. ms. stabenow: thank you very much. i first want to thank senator merkley who has been tireless in bringing forward the issues of the farmers and ranchers in oregon and to my colleagues who are here on the floor from new york and new jersey. i had the opportunity to be in new jersey with senator menendez and to see firsthand also with senator landrieu and senator tester, and it's very, very clear that this is a horrific situation and deserves our attention and support. what we are doing with this amendment, as modified -- i want to thank senator blunt for working with us in cosponsoring the amendment stk-rbs to basically -- is to basically take what we have done and passed in the farm bill and putting it into this very, very important disaster assistance bill. in the spring we experienced late freezes that wiped out many fruit crops in a number of states, including michigan, new york and pennsylvania. in my home state we had a 98% loss of cherry crop
to close. mr. sessions: i thank the gentlewoman for asking. i have no further speakers and would allow her that opportunity and then i will close. ms. slaughter: thank you very much. mr. speaker, we should be doing one thing today and that's passing the continuation of tax cuts for the middle class. the american people couldn't be more united in this support for tax cut and there is no reason for delay. the senate has already passed the bill and we can take up now, it's here at the desk. members across the aisle agree, that we must not let those middle class taxes go up. with such common ground why would the majority waste another minute before ensuring that the taxes will not go up on the middle class? the answer isn't clear to me. i can't fathom it. but if the majority won't take action, we will. mr. speaker, if we defeat the previous question, i'm going to offer an amendment to the rule that says two things. one, first we will pass the bill to extend the middle class tax cut. and second, that we will pass legislation that will avoid the fiscal cliff and the chaos that would ensue. and i
it faster and their model is ready, and i will concede, just let's get started. thank you, mr. chairman. >> i also thank her for 15 years, having union station, a true intermodal center, used to have people come to the greyhound station, drag their luggage to union station, we used to go around town to take a bus, and some satellite location and 15 months we have got that done and dedicated, came up for that during a very heated election but i thank you for your leadership. not this secretary but deputy secretary was instrumental in thanking the nation's capital having a true intermodal, like most of you. >> i want to thank our witnesses for being with us and i want to thank secretary ray lahood. it is your birthday. i would not have chosen to spend my birthday with you but glad you have chosen to spend your birthday with us. particularly to the chairman for holding this hearing and discussion -- a week and half ago to go to new york, bless amtrak forever, even on the assumption, and i do share your view, we have a densely populated corridor in the northeast, that requires no bust devel
back up, which is exactly what nancy pelosi proposed. we will take her proposal. and mr. van hollen says it will not give one a democratic road or something -- for something your leader proposed three months ago. that as political theater, mr. van hollen. >> thank you, mr. speaker. i wish the outgoing chairman of financial services well. this policy did not make the tax proposal that would -- nancy pelosi did not have a tax proposal that would give people earning over $1 million in tax break. no. 2, the proposal the president has put on the table has trillions of dollars of cuts, which is more than in the cuts on the table and would deal with the sequestered. the republican proposal will increase the likelihood taxpayers have to pay -- bailout the financial industry again. they strip away the independence of the consumer finance protection board so that lobbyists can meddle in exactly how they do their work so that they are looking out for the interests of lobbyists rather than the interests of the american people. this approach we're seeing here is another example of trying to help
for the president because he is generally very active but he is in good spirits. meanwhile, mrs. bush, who is 87, has been making two trips a day here to visit her husband. willie, at this point there is no timeline set for the former president's release. back to you. >> janet shamlian, thanks i know we add our name to the long list of people wishing the president well. >>> after what's been a disappointing holiday season, mara ca sharaschiavocampo has tt story. >> reporter: last minute sales. early numbers show the lowest growth in years, many still found a way to buy for everyone on their list. one of the most popular ways to shop, online. >> online was the big surprise. early indications showed they're in 16%, 17% growth rates and that's big news for them. >> big ticket items brought in big bucks. flat screen tvs, laptops and tablets all did well early on. the gift that stepped out above the rest didn't even make the top ten last year, shoes. >> the big surprise this holiday season was the footwear business. running shoes did really well. classic sneakers did really well. >> reporter: with th
to change. jody canter wrote this in "the new york times," mrs. clinton may find that her freedom comes with one huge constraint. the more serious she is about 2016, the less she can do, no frank, seen it all memoir, no clients, commissions or controversial positions that could prove problematic. now, i'm one of the so called smart guys that david was talking about. i think she is going to run. i think she wants to be the first woman president of the united states. she's going to have to be cautious in what she does over the next year or two. >> any candidate has to be cautious. >> well, if she's never going to run for office again, she doesn't have to be cautious. >> she's well known. people know her across the board. there are a sizable number of republicans who like her. the reason why people like her is because they know she's a principled person. somebody who believes in human rights. equality of all people. she'd make a terrific president of the united states. i don't think she has to be confined by those limitations miss canter wrote in her article. >> the problems we face in 201
." because she was in her doughnut hole. well, a couple weeks later, mrs. johnson would be back in the hospital. how wasteful is that? how -- why? why is that -- that costs a tremendous amount of money to our system. this is saving money. this is health care reform. this is medicare reform. it's improving people's health and saving money at the same time. so we have increased benefits, we've extended the life of medicare. that was done as part of health care reform. that is medicare reform. now, in the election, we had a discussion about this. there were a lot of ads about it. we know what governor romney would have done to medicare. he said very explicitly that -- and, again, the presiding officer has quoted this. he said very explicitly he would restore those billions and billions of dollars in overpayments to private insurance companies for no reason, for no good effect, just so that i guess these insurance companies could have more profit. instead, we reinvested this money into medicare. but he would have given it to the insurance companies. he would have replaced the health
's expected to remain at a new york hospital so doctors can monitor her condition. clinton was suffering from a stomach virus earlier this month when she fainted at home due to dehydration, causing the concussion. he is now out of intensive care. mr. bush has been in the hospital for more than a month now. for bronchitis and a fever. he is 88 years old. he is the oldest living former president. a family spokesman says that he has been alert and always in good spirits. >> returning to the new congress after being gone almost a full year for rehabilitation. his goal is to walk up the senate steps. you'll meet him at the top. the nets in practice last month when he climbed 37 flights of stairs at >> it's the last day of 2012 but it's the first day of a new era for the tribune company. after spending four years in a chapter 11 bankruptcy case, the chicago-based media company will emerge today under new ownership late last night, the new tribune company named its board of directors, and filed notification with a delaware bankruptcy court. the tribune company owns 23 television stations, eight dai
of the economy and the united states obviously has work to do, my oldest daughter is doing her doctorate in math. there's a substantial contribution to national security in any case. with respect to the dr. jekyll and mr. hyde bit, economic growth is fundamental and innovation is the key engine for that and freedom is the foundation for that. i think we will see this play out in interesting ways globally including within china, and as we work to have a very open system economically and take advantage of technology, we also need to look at what needs to be done to deal with the threats of not just cyber but biotech and so on and look at doing that in partnership, and the partners we look at, and a substantial conversation about the rules of the road in cyberspace, we do that with many others, a fundamental issue. >> got a little bit from global security, the issue of the islands is primarily an issue of energy, and we are seeing it all over the world today, we don't have good mechanisms, maritime energy disputes, not only in the united states and eastern mediterranean, our pick is coming up. with
leadership on all these adoption issues senator landrieu has shown and look forward to working with her and others as we try to help right this tragic wrong. and i would be glad to yield to my good friend from louisiana. the presiding officer: the senator from louisiana. ms. landrieu: thank you, mr. president. i am proud to join my friend, the senator from missouri, on the floor to add voice to this travesty that has recently occurred. the senator from missouri described the situation accurately, that a country that claims to be a powerful nation on the earth has decided to take powerful action against the weakest, most vulnerable individuals on the earth. and those are children without families. it makes no sense whatsoever for the country of russia to take the action that they did, because they're in a disagreement with us here in america, and maybe others around the world, about human rights violations regarding adults. the russian government in front of the whole world has taken that out, their anger and frustration, on their own children. their own children, who are orphans, their
and be reckoned as. [applause] now we would like to return to her speaker for a traditional city club question and answer. we welcome questions for my phone, putting guests. holding the microphone today is kerry miller. we have our first question please. >> mr. brousard commie talk about complexities facing the average american patient. certainly insurance exchanges in the next year or so will make it more complex. [inaudible] in the drafting of the affordable care act. why didn't humana and the others try to copy the systems of canada and other parts of europe like having a single-payer take care of all medical expenses? 's been a good question. we could probably be here quite some time to answer. from our vantage point, what we see if this is somehow works in canada and it does not have the care level here in the united states. even in the european countries like the u.k., they too have a one payer system. what happens it is cause long lines and health care is delayed in getting to people in the result is a dear. it is a more simpler model under one roof or an ape in a society that can acces
,", which, you know, was profittedly based on anna wintour. your thoughts on that, mr. ambassador. >> how do you know she's not going to be the next secretary of state? why limit her to a mere ambassadorship? it wouldn't surprise me. it has been historically the case that large contributors to presidential campaigns get appointed -- megyn: and she's one of the top ten bundlers for president obama. >> and i have to tell you, i've had wide experience with political appointees -- true, mostly republicans -- and they've been very effective. i would not underestimate how important it is overseas to have somebody who knows the president personally, who could call the president if they needed to. and here's the really important thing, who cares first and foremost about the president's policy. not about what the bureaucracy at the state department wants, but about the president's policy. i'm not saying anna wintour's going to do all that -- megyn: right. >> but that is important. megyn: what does that person do? if you become the boord to the u.k., what do you do? >> well, that is one of the hardest
conservatives and liberal democrats have gone along with all of it. may i say, mr. speaker, what a pity he not to see the honorable member be secure in her place. from the jungle, she may not have it succeeded in talking to the nation on many things. but she did think for the nation when she called the prime minister of the chancellor [inaudible] [cheers] mr. speaker. no wonder this prime minister keeps on losing his temper. because his worst nightmare is coming through. economic credibility as part of an constant and unfair. yes, he is the chancellor. can someone get him out of here? [cheers] mr. speaker. fiscal rule is broken on every target that they set themselves. failing and failing. 212 billion pounds more borrowing than they promised two years ago. [inaudible] unfair, incompetent, and completely out of touch. before he heard my statement and before he let at the forecast. we don't jiggle the numbers in the treasury anywhere. that's when he was in the treasury. the budget responsibility and that is the problem he's got. his whole honesty was about complaining it is going to. that's
with guys, according to askmen. >> gretchen: she looks gorgeous. mr. kilmeade, now let's talk to you about some critters. >> brian: the crew backs her ranking, by the way. judging by ted has look. instead of buying another sweater or tie this christmas, which people really want to return, why not consider the gift of pet rescue, whether you donate, whether you volunteer, whether you adopt, there are many ways you can help. here to tell us more, loretta is here, president of forgotten friends of long island, and ma lay in a is here, coordinator. they're trying to find homes for these great animals. today it's rusty and lucky. welcome back to both of you. >> thank you so much for having us. >> brian: who is rusty and ho is lucky? >> this is rusty. >> brian: rusty, tell me about rusty. >> okay. rusty is a little chihuahua that was rescued from animal care and control here in the city. we rescued him the day before sandy hit. he actually was starting to get sick in the she willer -- shelter and we were afraid he would end up on the euthanasia list. she picked hip up and brought him to us. niec
. they wrote books. >> they are in many cases quite frankly more interesting as human beings than her husband. if only because they are not first and foremost limited by political ambition. >> dolly was both a socially adept and politically savvy. >> dolly madison loved every minute of it. mrs. munro hated it. absolutely hated it spent she warned her husband. you know, you can't rule without including what women want and what women have to contribute spent during the statement he was a little breathless and it was too much looking that i think goes a little too fast. a change of pace. >> yes, ma'am. >> probably the most tragic of all of our first ladies, they never should have married. >> she later wrote in her memoir that she said i, myself, never made any decision. i only decided what was important, and went to resend it to my husband. >> you stop and think about how much power that is. it's a lot of power. >> prior to the battle against cancer is to fight the fear that accompanies the disease. >> she transform the way we look at these bugaboos, and made a possible for countless people to s
, says her boss won't be leaving the hospital anytime soon. he is in intensive care with complications from bronchitis. but she says the 88-year-old mr. bush would advise to put the harps back in the closet. because he's getting excellent treatment. >>> and secretary of state hillary clinton will return to work next week. she hasn't been seen in public since suffering a concussion about two weeks ago after a fainting spell brought on by a stomach bug. >>> and the fiscal cliff in washington isn't the only major threat to the u.s. economy. this morning, time is running out to avoid a strike by 14,000 dockworkers from boston to houston for demanding better pay. 14 ports which handle half of the nation's shipping traffic are threatened. workers could walk off the job this sunday, costing the economy an estimated $1 billion per day. >>> and for the second time this month, someone has been pushed to their death on a new york subway. a woman seen running away on the left side of this surveillance video, right here, shoved a man on to the tracks last night. he was then crushed by an oncoming t
and is testament to her strength and her spirit. the people of maine and america are grateful for her many years of service. i am grateful for her leadership and her friendship. and i know that olympia snowe will continue to influence national policy for many years to come. mr. president, we have a tradition in the senate of referring to our colleagues on the senate floor during debate as "my friend from this state" or "my friend from that state," and oftentimes the word "friend" really just means colleague. but there is a fellow senator whom i call friend in the truest sense of the word, and that person, mr. president, is the senior senator from connecticut, my dear friend, senator joe lieberman. when joe lieberman announced early last year that he would not seek reelection to the senate, he called himself a lucky guy for having had the opportunity to serve his state and his country. i would contend that it is we in this chamber and the people throughout connecticut and across our nation who are the ones who are truly fortunate, for joe lieberman's life long commitment to public service, includ
. cent 1600 dollars and the press was tough on her which is fuby when we lock at how much they spent today. >> steve: i remember in the reagan term. mrs. reagan used to have celebrity secret santas >> she was. she was all about glits and glamour and this white house is what you wanted to so. she had mr. t and larry hagman was a celebrity sant a. >> there is mr. t. >> gretchen: and finally laura bush. you were instrumental to helping . >> she invited me to be a part of the decorating team. it was elegance and being understated and red, white and blue christmas and incorporated books and stories and made it enchanting for children. it is christmas with the first ladies and beautiful stories and pictures as well. >> thank you so much for having me. >> gretchen: merry christmas. >> steve: thieves try to rip off a church and get a shock instead. >> brian: high school basketball team ends with a score of 107-2 . the coach of the losing team is here next. ♪ this holiday, share everything. share "not even close." share "you owe me..." share "just right." the share everything plan. sharable
in their homes, it will be a lot more beneficial. >> mr. fugate, when you and the president went to atlantic city the runner of the marine now got a hug from the president and president introduced her to you. they said they do not help businesses. she got a lower rate for a loan from community bank and she thought she was used as a font of -- a photo op. >> the tool we use is the small business administration and these loan programs. that's what we have available. >> with legislation and waiting to change that? secretary donovan says they want to make businesses whole. >> la businesses are the biggest challenge. the tool that is is readily available are the small business disaster loans. for those without insurance, and as always meet the needs. one of the biggest losses we see in a disaster is a small business. oftentimes they have very high failure rates. part of what we're looking at it and knowing about it will not address all of these issues. how'd we put money back into the local economy quicker? where can you bring in additional resources to help small businesses as they deal with not only
times. mr. chairman you said a moment ago the threshold was based on analysis of policy. in the optimal policy that -- laid out in her speech a few weeks ago assured interest rates occurring in early 2016. is that the policy that the fed is now following and secondly if i may you referred to a number of inflation forecasts in your introductory remarks. in that case how will we ever know the inflation threshold has been hit? thank you. 's bees. >> so that kind of optimal policy path that vice chairman yellin shows is indicative of the kinds of analysis we have done. where provided for different scenarios and different assumptions about models but the general or of that interest-rate path i.e. that it stays low until unemployment is in the vicinity of 6.5 for little or and then rises relatively slowly which goes back to the question asked earlier that it doesn't involve a rapid removal of accommodation after that point is reached. that is consistent with that kind of analysis, that type of analysis that was not the only thing we looked at but was informative in our discussion. you will no
further weaken them. ms mr. hanna has clearly stated, once gain the benefit are limited down because people who currently receive in benefits be cut, but as he stated in her testimony come you're going to go back to current employees and say hey, you need to pony up some more money that you may never get. so i think that's an issue and another issue is that the pbgc lines up in bankruptcy. i think this situation is clear that up to firm up the line line, and place it over there for decades are not at the front of the line. they could potentially beginning in much reduced benefit. doesn't mean that they will. i think a lot of those things are just questions, not particularly solutions, the things we have to work on them we don't have a lot of time to do it. the subcommittee is very active in coming up with legislation to help and i'm interested in knowing how much of the green has been improved by our accounting that we changed the assumptions because i think of .5%, even though i understand the historic assumptions have not occurred in the last 10, 12 plus years. i started this discu
with a more than $3 million positive balance. this progressive steps she took. i listened to her and i believe that's the kind of leadership that can help us continue down this path. >> senator hagan. >> thank you, mr. chairman. mr. secretary, thank you for your testimony today. i know that senator corker asked about reverse mortgages and i am concerned about that issue and i'm particularly concerned that $2.8 billion of the 16 billion economic shortfall are related to the program. can you talk more about why these classes on the reverse mortgage program? >> here's the fundamental problem without getting into too much of the history. at one point when fannie mae was issuing these phones, they were generally variable rate they allowed a borrower to basically draw on it over time the amount of money they need. as that program has switched to being a chimney may program, there is basically no option for those borrowers to do anything to try the full amount. >> why? >> because we don't have the statutory authority to be able to make the changes that would allow us to limit the draw up front. that
that she took. i listened to her, and i believe that is the kind of leadership to help us continue down this path. >> thank you. senator? >> thank you. thank you for your testimony today mr. secretary. i know the senator asked about reverse mortgages. i am concerned about that issue. i am particularly concerned that $2.80 billion of the $16 billion economic shortfall are related. can you talk a little more about why these losses are so severe? >> here is the fundamental problem, without getting into too much detail. the loans were generally variable rate and allowed the borrower. there is basically no option for them to do anything but draw the full amount. >> why? >> we do not have the statutory authority to be able to make the changes to the program to allow us to limit the draw up front. that is the change we are asking to be made. our alternative, and i was just discussing this, we could basically eliminate or put a moratorium on our regular program, which is somewhat safer. the problem is we do not have that authority under that program to avoid the full-draw feature of it. the rig
on pushing her and now say republicans who criticize her are doing it because she's black and a woman. >> we haven't had a white male secretary of state in 15 years. not since the incompetent mr. christopher was secretary of state. that is part of a larger landscape that i'm worried about because since 2009, we thought we had gone beyond race. but if you look at comments people are making offhandedly, everybody from samuel l. jackson to the reverend joseph lowery said white people belong in hell and just lately jamie fox joked about shooting white people, morgan freeman, it's almost as if there has been an outpouring of racial separatism and hostility. it's not a good climate. >> steve: when colin powell was secretary of state and when he was criticized, nobody came back and said, well you're doing that because of the color of his skin. same thing with condoleeza rice, when she was excoriated by senator barbara boxer. >> and gonzalez, same thing. attorney general. so there is not just race, but it's race and the ideology and politics. why are people doing it? because it gives them a politica
the centerpieces home with you. >> coming up on c-span, california rep and democrat lynn woolsey delivers her farewell address from the house floor. followed by a tribute by other members of congress to outgoing california representatives. mr. speaker, throughout my career in public life and even before nothing has motivated me more than a desire to end wars and violent conflict. when i was a small girl, saying bedtime ayers or making a birthday wish blowing out the candles, i always asked for world peace. so no surprise that over a decade ago i opposed the iraq war before it even started. it was appalling that we would invade a nation that hadn't provoked us, had nothing to do with 9/11, and did not have weapons of mass destruction. it was a lonely fight at that time. but i didn't do it to be loved. it was a matter of principle. barbara lee, maxinwaters, and i formed the triad, woolsey-waters-lee to organize our opposition. we held forums. we developed and out of iraq caucus. we traveled around the country. and in january, 2005, i offered the first amendment here on the house floor calling f
than $3 billion positive balance. those were aggressive steps that she took. i listened to her but she took those. and i believe that that's the kind of leadership that can help us continue down this path. >> thank you. senator hagen. >> thank you, mr. chairman. and, mr. secretary, thanks for your testimony today. i know that senator corker asked about reverse mortgages. and i am concerned about that issue and i'm particularly concerned that $2.8 billion of the $16 billion economic shortfall are related to that program. can you talk a little bit more about why these losses under the reverse mortgage program are so is he rear? >> here's the fundamental problem. without getting into too much of the history. at one point when fannie mae was issuing these loans, they were generally variable rate and they could -- they allowed a borrower to basically draw on a, you know, over time, the amount of money that they needed. as that program has switched to being a ginny may program, there is basically no option for those borrowers to do anything but draw the full amount. >> and why? >> because we
in the chamber wishing to vote or wishing to change his or her vote? if not, on this vote, the nays are 41, the nays are 54. under the previous order requiring 60 votes for the adoption of this amendment, the amendment is not agreed to. ms. mikulski: mr. president? the presiding officer: the senator from maryland. ms. mikulski: mr. president, i understand we will now be going to the reid substitute; is that correct? the presiding officer: that is correct. ms. mikulski: mr. president, i ask unanimous consent that senator frank lautenberg be added as a cosponsor to the reid substitute. the presiding officer: without objection, so ordered. under the previous order there will now be two minutes of debate equally divided prior to a vote on substitute amendment 3395. who yields time? ms. mikulski: mr. president, our side yields back all time. the presiding officer: is all time yielded back? mr. cochran: mr. president, we yield back all time on this side. ms. mikulski: mr. president, i ask for a voice vote. the presiding officer: the question is on the substitute amendment. all in favor say aye.
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